DeafHear Regional News

Regional News


Story of the Month

‘I was too vain to wear the hearing aids I desperately needed’:
As her hearing deteriorated, BEL MOONEY felt cut off from the world

Posted: 1st December 2016

Bel Mooney is the advice columnist in the UK newspaper’s Daily Mail. In this month’s Story of the Month we learn how Bel’s hearing started gradually deteriorating, how she initially avoided dealing with her hearing loss, and how she finally took action and regained her quality of life.

DeafHear.ie Story of the Month: ‘I was too vain to  wear the hearing aids I desperately needed’: As her hearing deteriorated,  BEL MOONEY felt cut off from the world.

Bel Mooney


Denial

At first I pushed the realisation away, refusing to believe that my hearing was deteriorating. It started eight years ago, gradually. First, watching TV became a struggle. I’d turn up the volume until, in time, my poor husband (younger than I!) was deafened.

At the theatre, I’d strain to hear – sometimes struggling to follow an unfamiliar play because I would miss parts of the dialogue. At a party, where the background noise was loud, I just nodded and pretended to hear. I felt too embarrassed to keep saying ‘I’m sorry?’ or ‘Say again?’. Who knows what mistakes I might have made.

Back at home, whenever I missed something, my husband said I would stubbornly point out that he has a very soft voice.

Yes, it’s called denial. It was tough to acknowledge my hearing loss because, like many people. I associated the problem with being old – and I didn’t feel old at all. I had an image of myself as a young, confident, 60-something woman with a successful career and responsibilities. I still felt (or should I say ‘feel’) glamorous, and a hearing aid didn’t fit this image.


Avoidance

So for years I went on making excuses and pretending I didn’t need help. But, as a journalist, it’s my job to engage with people, and to listen. What’s more, I have to promote my books – which means speaking in public, and answering questions.

Phone calls need to be made, but I started to find it hard to hear what colleagues were saying. But instead of acknowledging the issue, I started to keep phone conversations to a minimum and used email instead.

At last I saw the irony. As the Daily Mail’s advice columnist, I read problem letters every day. I’m employed to give advice and encourage my readers to take action and find solutions. Yet here I was, with a condition which affected all aspects of my life, refusing to come clean and admit to myself that I needed help.

 

Yet here I was, with a condition which affected all aspects of my life, refusing to come clean and admit to myself that I needed help.

 

Finding Out

One day in 2011, I was standing outside our farmhouse near Bath with my husband. It was a very beautiful day. ‘Listen to that!’ he said. ‘I think it’s a buzzard’. But I could hear nothing. No glorious wild sound of a bird of prey, calling high in the blue sky, disturbed my muffled ears.

When I confessed, my husband looked slightly shocked. It was then I realised I had to put this right. At the time, grandchildren were expected (in fact, my first two were born in 2012) and I would want to hear their little voices, wouldn’t I? Telling myself that wearing a hearing aid would be no different from wearing contact lenses, I at last vowed to act.


Taking Action

My first action was to visit the GP and be referred to my local National Health Service (NHS) hearing centre. I was immensely pleased to have made the first step, but unfortunately it was to lead nowhere. 

It took ages – more than a month – for an appointment to arrive in the post, and the date they gave was about six weeks ahead. But then, the day before my appointment, the centre phoned to say they would have to postpone due to unexpected staff shortages, so could we make another one? Already, we were looking a couple of months ahead.

So I was back to square one – which was nowhere. Frustrated, but fatalistic, I let things slide once again. Believe me, I don’t blame the NHS for the blip. Nevertheless, it’s been pointed out that NHS rationing of hearing aids is likely to be fuelling the epidemic of Alzheimer’s disease. 

DeafHear.ie Story of the Month: ?I was too vain to  wear the hearing aids I desperately needed?: As her hearing deteriorated,  BEL MOONEY felt cut off from the world.

Bel Mooney.
After finally getting her hearing back, she says she vividly remembers walking into my garden and hearing birdsong for the first time

 

The warning follows research showing that the risk of dementia rockets as hearing fades. The most deaf are five times more likely to develop the disease, and even mild hearing loss seems to have an effect. Charities and medical staff in the

UK have said that doctors must stop thinking of hearing loss as being inconsequential and start treating it. Overall, just one third of the six million Britons who could benefit from hearing aids have them.

My decision to take care of myself was sensible – and serendipity intervened. I was driving through Bath when I saw a modest sign on a shop for a private hearing aid service. The next day I saw an advertisement in a magazine for the same High Street chain of hearing centres, so rang and made an appointment within the week. Just like that. 

This was two and a half years ago – a very long time after I first started to turn up the TV volume. The test revealed that my hearing loss was more severe than I’d imagined, which left me shocked.

 

When she finally took a hearing test two and a half years ago,
Bel discovered the hearing loss was more severe than she imagined

 

I have since learned that because hearing loss is so gradual, a person with symptoms often doesn’t realise the severity and doesn’t realise what sounds they are missing.

Hearing Aids

My audiologist spent time taking me through the different options available and I eventually settled on a pair of hearing aids suitable for my lifestyle. At first I rather reeled at the cost – which was 4,000. 

On the other hand, I was buying a pair of exquisitely tiny computers that would tuck behind my ears, coloured to match my hair, with the part that went inside my ears pretty well invisible.

You can’t put a price on your senses. Hearing is fundamental to living, so I told myself it was a purchase worth making, especially if I considered it in terms of so much per day for at least six years.

At first I forgot to use them. I suppose I was still resisting the idea, since the thought of putting something inside your ear isn’t natural. In fact, I’ve worn contact lenses since I was 20 and it’s actually infinitely easier to get used to a hearing aid. Initially, though, I found the batteries fiddly and worried I was going to break the delicate little appliances. However with some perseverance I managed to adapt and now the benefits are incredible.

 

DeafHear.ie Story of the Month: ?I was too vain to  wear the hearing aids I desperately needed?: As her hearing deteriorated,  BEL MOONEY felt cut off from the world.

Bel says she has since learned that because hearing loss is so gradual, a person with symptoms often doesn’t realise the severity and doesn’t realise what sounds they are missing


Making Life Easier

No more muffled living. I vividly remember walking into my garden and hearing bird song for the first time. It was wonderful.

I now wear the hearing aids every day, and I tell people about them all the time because it’s so important to be open and counter any stigma. We all need to look after ourselves and be honest about what we need to do to improve our quality of life.

I haven’t just made my hearing better, I’ve improved my social life (since parties are less of a strain), family and working life. Who wouldn’t want to hear a grandchild’s sweet little mumbling? Or every note of a favourite song?

 

’I vividly remember walking into my garden and hearing bird song for the first time. It was wonderful.’

 

A life without sound can be lonely. Hearing loss shouldn’t be looked at as an age-related condition because (as my hearing specialist told me) young people can have the problem too. Even though I’m entirely satisfied with the hearing aids I invested in nearly three years ago, at the moment I’m just trialling an upgrade, which is even more state of the art.

For example, the other night in the theatre I used a small hand control to improve the clarity of the actors.

What a revelation it was – first, to hear the sound change and second to have the power to control the technology. I’d urge anyone who is worried about their hearing to seek help straight away.   


Don’t Delay!

The longer you wait the more your hearing deteriorates and the harder it is adapt to technology. And just think of all the lovely conversation and glorious birdsong you might be missing.

 

’I now wear the hearing aids every day, and I tell people about them
all the time because it’s so important to be open and counter any stigma,’ Bel says

 

Source: Daily Mail

 

DeafHear.ie Line Break Image

 

Check out our Mind Your Hearing Campaign for further information on tacking action to address a hearing loss.

 

www.mindyourhearing.ie

 

Resources

Format
Size
Download

Concerned About Hearing Loss Leaflet

Download File
485kb
Download File
The following above file(s) have been saved as Adobe Acrobat PDF file. You will need to have Adobe Reader installed on your computer. If you do not have Adobe Reader on your computer simply click the button below and follow the simple steps.

 

DeafHear.ie Line Break Image

Check out our previous Story of the Month!

Paul’s Story
October 2016


We meet Paul Ryder, the Supervisor of the Communtiy Employment Scheme based in Deaf Village Ireland (DVI) in Cabra in Dublin. Paul tells us a bit about himself and his work in DVI.
Read On…

More Stories of the Month can be viewed here...

DeafHear.ie Story of the Month: Paul Ryder

 

    


 

more...Hearing loss costs an estimated €2.2bn every year in Ireland.

 

go to top...


Legal, Compliancy & Security

 

Registered Office: DeafHear.ie, 35 North Frederick Street, Dublin 1, Ireland.

Tel: +353 (0)1 8175700 Minicom: +353 (0)1 8175777 Fax: 01 8723816 Text: 087 922 1046

Charity Number:
CHY 5633 Charities Regulatory Authority (CRA) Number: 20008772
Copyright © 2017 DeafHear      Legal      Returns Policy      Accessibility      Contact

Secure on-line payment using realex payments

All major Credit / Debit Cards accepted